Depression Test (3 Minutes Quiz)

This brief guide will offer a depression test that takes only 3 minutes to assess and later will discuss DSM-V criteria for the diagnosis of depressive disorder, the causes, and the treatment options for depression.

Depression Test 3 Minutes

Almost 20 million of the American population experience depression, however, but not many seek treatment. The Depression self-test is a simple quiz to help you identify the symptoms of depression and its intensity in your life. Depression is not just a feeling of sadness, it is a real mental condition characterized by uncontrollable sadness and despair.

The following depression test will help you rate the symptoms of depression. Try to observe your routine over the past fifteen days, and rank the questions, 5 being always and 1 being never.

  • Have you experienced extreme sadness, most of the time without any real reason?
  • Have you observed a drastic change in your appetite?
  • Have you observed a drastic change in your sleep pattern?
  • Are you fatigued or lethargic without even doing much work?
  • Do you cry without any apparent reason?
  • Do you think there is no joy and excitement in life?
  • Are you contemplating existence and death?
  • Do you think life would be better if you were not here, without actively trying to take your life?
  • Are you hopeless about the future?
  • Do you think you are worthless?
  • Do you think no one can help you in your situation or there is no one that can understand?
  • Do you find it impossible to find the motivation to do anything?
  • Have you noticed that you are not much bothered about any self-care activities?
  • Do you feel like a loser?
  • Do you feel hopeless?
  • Do you feel like being alone most of the time and start avoiding people you usually liked?
  • Do you have trouble sleeping or staying asleep?

If you ranked between 3-5 to more than 12 of the above questions then you might be facing the signs and symptoms of depression. For an official diagnosis for depression, you must visit a mental health professional or a psychiatrist. They will run a sequence of diagnostic questions to unveil the symptoms of depression. Clients must spend some time with their physician to discuss their moods, signs, symptoms, and behavior. However, if you do notice some signs and symptoms of depression in you, you must go to a qualified mental health practitioner to get an official diagnosis.

DSM-V Criteria For Depression Disorder

Five or more of the symptoms have been persistent in the two weeks and show a change from previous functioning; at least one of the symptoms is either loss of pleasure or interest or depressed mood.

  • Depressed mood most of the day, almost daily, as shown by either subjective reports (feeling sad, hopelessness, emptiness) or observation made by others (apparently tearful). In children and adolescents, it can be irritability.
  • Significant loss of interest or joy in all, or almost all activities, most of the day, almost daily (as shown by either subject account or observation).
  • Significant weight loss or weight gain without conscious efforts.
  • Loss or increase in appetite.
  • Hypersomnia or insomnia
  • Loss of energy or fatigue
  • Psychomotor agitation or retardation almost daily. 
  • Feelings of worthlessness or excessive misplaced guilt (maybe delusional) almost every day (not just self-reproach or guilt about being ill).
  • Loss of concentration and focus, indecisiveness, almost every day ( either by the subject themself or observations).
  • Recurring thoughts of death (not just fear of death), recurrent suicidal thoughts, and ideation without.

1.  Precise plan, or a suicide attempt, or a planned scheme for committing suicide.

2. The symptoms that result in clinically significant worry or change in occupation, social, or other important areas of functioning.

3. The depressive episode is not characterized by the physiological impacts of a substance or other medical condition.

Note: 1-3 are the symptoms of a major depressive episode.

4. The existence of the major depressive episode is not better explained by schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, schizophreniform disorder, delusional disorder, or other specified and unspecified schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders.

5. There has never been a hypomanic or manic episode. 

What Are The Symptoms of Depression?

During the depression, the following symptoms of low moods are exhibited:

  • Feeling of hopelessness, worthlessness, and overall pessimist view.
  • Loss of energy
  • Not able to enjoy the things that they previously did.
  • Trouble focusing
  • Forgetfulness
  • Slow speech
  • Less libido
  • Inability to feel pleasure
  • Uncontrolled crying
  • Irritability
  • Insomnia
  • Needing more sleep
  • Trouble in decision making
  • Appetite changes leading to weight gain or weight loss.
  • Death or suicidal thoughts
  • Attempts to suicide. 

In Addition to the low mood, depression affects the ability to think, focus, or make bad decisions, rendering them more dysfunctional. Depression can also cause memory difficulties and experience cognitive difficulties. Children with depression may exhibit low or poor grades in their results, depicting poor focus.

What Are The Causes Of Depression?

The causes of depression can be diverse and unique to each person. Some may observe depression due to traumatic and abusive events or relationships, negative intrusive thoughts, low self-esteem, and low serotonin levels.

Genetic causes have been researched to cause moderate to severe depression. It has been found that if the parents have depression, there is a 15 to 20% chance of a child having a mood disorder as compared to the other population, which makes for 1 to 2%.

The environmental causes of depression are more common and often result due to prolonged suffering, like problems at school or work, or difficult marriage.

Adversaries of any form contribute as an acute stressor that transpires to form depression. Most of the physical conditions are non-specific stressors but some of them transpire to form depressive disorder through a direct biological process. For instance, depression after giving childbirth, postnatal depression is a common occurrence in women.

What Is The Treatment For Depression?

Some of the treatment options for depression are described below

Medication

Medication is the primary treatment, majorly involving:

  • Antidepressants
  • Mood stabilizers, like lamotrigine, carbamazepine, valproate, or lithium.
  • Antipsychotic drugs like quetiapine, cariprazine, olanzapine, and lurasidone.
  • Anti-anxiety pills or sleep medicines like benzodiazepines or sedatives.
  • Antidepressant-antipsychotic drugs, a combination of antidepressant and mood stabilizers.

It can take some time to discover the right combination for you. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should talk to their doctor about medications that are safe for safety.

Psychotherapy

Psychotherapy is also recommended, along with medications. Some of the options in this regard are:

  • Interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (ISPRT)
  • Psychoeducation
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)
  • Family-focused therapy

Lifestyle Changes

  • Some lifestyle changes can also be helpful:
  • Regular exercise and workout regimen
  • Follow a routine
  • Learn to pick your mood swings.
  • Get support from family, friends, or groups.
  • Learn to manage stress.
  • Keep a journal or chart for your symptoms.
  • Find sports and healthy hobbies.
  • Avoid alcohol or recreational drugs.

The more you know about your mental conditions and symptoms, the better you’ll be able to manage your condition. It will be helpful to have a compassionate company to manage your condition. Support groups and friends can help you in talking through the situation.

Conclusion

This brief guide offered a depression test that takes only 3 minutes to assess and discussed DSM-V criteria for the diagnosis of depressive disorder, the causes, and the treatment options for depression.

Depression disorders, according to the DSM 5 are a period of at least two weeks when a person experienced a depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities and had a majority of specified symptoms, such as problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration, or self-worth.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs): Depression Test 3 Minutes

What is the DSM 5 definition of depression?

The clinical definition of depression, according to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders (DSM-5), is “a period of at least two weeks when a person experienced a depressed mood or loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities and had a majority of specified symptoms, such as problems with sleep, eating, energy, concentration, or self-worth.”

Is it possible to diagnose yourself with depression?

For an official diagnosis of depression, you must visit a mental health professional or a psychiatrist. They will run a sequence of diagnostic questions to unveil the symptoms of depression. Clients must spend some time with their physician to discuss their moods, signs, symptoms, and behavior. However, if you do notice some signs and symptoms of depression in you, you must go to a qualified mental health practitioner to get an official diagnosis.

What are the 5 signs of mental illness?

  • Social isolation and withdrawal
  • Drastic and dramatic changes in appetite and sleep.
  • Excessive worry, anxiety, or paranoia.
  • Prolonged sadness or irritation.
  • Extreme mood swings.

How many categories of depression does the DSM 5 recognize?

There are now eight specific disorders mentioned in the depressive disorders chapter of DSM 5. These categories are listed below:

  • Major Depressive Disorder
  • Disruptive mood Dysregulation Disorder
  • Persistent Depressive Disorder (Dysthymia)
  • Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder 
  • Substance//Medication-induced Depressive disorder
  • Depressive disorder due to other medical condition
  • Other specified depressive disorder
  • Unspecified depressive disorder

What are the DSM IV criteria for depression?

DSM IV criteria for depression include depressed mood throughout or most part of the day, for at least two years with the existence of two or more of the following symptoms that can cause a clinically prominent change in work, social, or other important aspects of functioning:

  1. Lack of appetite or overeating.
  2. Insomnia or hypersomnia
  3. Fatigue or lack of energy
  4. Worthlessness or excessive guilt
  5. Recurring death thoughts
  6. Loss of interest or pleasure in most activities
  7. The depressed mood throughout the day
  8. Unintentional weight gain or loss.
  9. Agitation or psychomotor retardation is experienced by others.

References

https://www.utsouthwestern.edu/education/medical-school/departments/psychiatry/research/center/self-rating-test.html

https://psychcentral.com/quizzes/depression-quiz

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