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The PIP Decision Timescale (A Comprehensive Guide)

This article will discuss The PIP Decision Timescale. 2 different situations in which applicants or claimants for PIP benefits may have to wait and how long. The article will also comment on why they need to wait and what may happen during that wait. There will be some discussion on what PIP is and whether it is permanent or not.

The PIP Decision Timeline – How Long Is The Wait

Here are the decision timelines if you have made an application with regards to your PIP benefit:

  • PIP Claim: 12 – 14 weeks 
  • Mandatory Reconsideration: No Such Deadline
  • PIP Review: 1 year

Let us take a closer look at these decision timelines in detail and see what circumstances affect them!

The PIP Claim – 12 To 14 Weeks

You have to wait around 12 weeks to get your decision with regards to the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) assessment you have taken to receive benefits in order to cope with a long term injury or disability you have sustained.

It takes quite some time because of the information the concerned department has to process with regards to your case. In this case, the concerned department is the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) which will make a decision after you have completed your medical assessment and have sent in other relevant documents such as your claims and the notes made by the health professional during or with regards to your medical assessment.

Thus, the following 3 sources of information are taking into consideration:

  • Your Claim
  • Your Medical Assessment
  • Health Professionals Comments

To process all this information and make a decision, the DWP takes about 12 weeks to get back to you! However, due to the current situation where the pandemic is raging across the planet and the DWP has admitted to further delays in this process, the applicant may have to wait upto or even more than 14 weeks.

How Does The PIP Assessment Decision Reach You?

The decision reaches you through mail after about 12 weeks at the address you have provided in your personal information.

Mandatory Reconsideration – No Such Deadline

Unfortunately there is no such deadline or timeline for this procedure. It can take as less as 14 days only if the case is simple and straightforward where no additional information is needed. 

However, at the same time, it can take upto months to review a case and give a new decision especially if it is complicated and the following circumstances have arisen:

  • The assessor provided inaccurate information
  • The previous condition of the applicant has changed
  • More information is needed with regards to the case

In case 6 weeks have gone by and you have not heard from the Department for Work and Pension then you should contact them to find out if anything is wrong or they need additional information or simply to give them a reminder!

PIP Review – 1 year

In most cases, the PIP benefits you receive are not life long and they will eventually be reviewed during the time you receive this award. Usually, your PIP claim is reviewed a year before your award is meant to end. During this time you will be contacted with regards to your condition and additional information may also be demanded from you.

The beneficiary will still receive PIP even if their case is being reviewed.

Here is what happens:

  • You will receive the ‘Award Review – How Your Disability Affects You’ form which you will need to fill out.
  • Fill in the form using the instructions or notes that come with it.
  • Send the form and any supporting information you have not shared with the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) before – the form explains what to include and where to send it. You’ll need to return it within 1 month. Contact the PIP enquiry line if you need more time.
  • After you have sent in the required or relevant information, the DWP will review your form and case. However, if they need additional information they will contact you for further assessments. These assessments can be in person or over the phone. In the current situation, assessments will likely be held over the phone or through a video call due to the pandemic.
  • Once the entire process is complete, you will be informed through another letter about what will happen. If the department deems your needs have changed then your PIP may be increased, decreased or terminated.

Now that we have taken a look at the different waiting periods you may have to go through with regards to PIP, let us take a closer look at what this non-taxable benefit is!

What Is PIP?

PIP stands for Personal Independence Pay that is a non-taxable benefit which can be availed by people who suffer from a long term condition or injury that affects their daily life activities and mobility. 

This means they cannot walk properly or carry out simple or basic tasks such as eating properly or doing simple well being tasks like taking a bath. This benefit is given to people not based on the condition itself but the way it affects the person and their life activities.

It takes quite some time because of the information the concerned department has to process with regards to your case. In this case, the concerned department is the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) which will make a decision after you have completed your medical assessment and have sent in other relevant documents such as your claims and the notes made by the health professional during or with regards to your medical assessment.

Thus, the following 3 sources of information are taking into consideration:

  • Your Claim
  • Your Medical Assessment
  • Health Professionals Comments

How Does PIP Help Me?

This assessment has two components to it that affect what you get. These two components are:

  • Daily Living Part: The weekly rate for the daily living part of PIP is either £60.00 or £89.60.
  • Mobility Part: The weekly rate for the mobility part of PIP is either £23.70 or £62.55.
  • Terminal Illness: You’ll get the higher daily living part if you’re not expected to live more than 6 months. The rate of the mobility part depends on your needs.

What you get depends not on the illness but the extent to how much it affects you. It is observed whether or not you are affected by this illness and if so how much; are you able to perform daily tasks or not and can you move from one place easily or not.

PIP is usually paid every 4 weeks and the decision that reaches you in the form of a letter apprises you about the amount you will receive and on what day you will be paid. In case your pay date is a bank holiday then you will be paid before that. 

All benefits, pensions and allowances are paid into your bank, building society or credit union account.

What Benefits Does PIP Give Me?

The criteria consider the difficulties you have and the help you need in the following areas.

Daily living

  • preparing food (including needing prompting or supervision to cook) taking nutrition (which means eating, including needing prompting or supervision)
  • managing therapy or monitoring a health condition (including needing reminding to take medication)
  • washing and bathing (including needing prompting or supervision to wash)
  • managing toilet needs or incontinence (including needing prompting or supervision)
  • dressing and undressing (including needing prompting)
  • communicating verbally (including needing communication support)
  • reading and understanding signs, symbols, and words (including needing prompting to read or understand written information)
  • engaging with other people face-to-face (which means being able to interact in an appropriate manner, understand body language and establish relationships)
  • making budgeting decisions (which includes the need for assistance when planning a budget or managing and paying bills).

Mobility

  • planning and following a journey (including needing prompting or assistance to make a journey)
  • moving around (this looks at physical ability to move around).

Conclusion

This article took a comprehensive approach to understand the different waiting periods you may experience when it comes to the PIP. What circumstances affect these waiting periods were also discussed and how one can make the most of them were also highlighted in this article. Finally, the article also provided an introduction to what PIP is and how it benefits people in their day to day life emphasizing that it is not based on the severity of the disease but the impact it has on a person’s life.

References

https://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/benefits/benefits-introduction/problems-with-benefits-and-tax-credits/challenging-a-benefit-decision/challenging-a-dwp-benefit-decision-on-or-after-28-october-2013/challenging-a-benefit-or-tax-credit-decision-asking-for-a-reconsideration/
https://www.gov.uk/pip/when-your-pip-claim-is-reviewed

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