What are resilience scales?

As a BetterHelp affiliate, we may receive compensation from BetterHelp if you purchase products or services through the links provided.

In this blog we will discuss what resilience scales are.

We will also discuss what are the various kinds of resilience scales used in research and clinical practice, as well as understand what are somethings that one can do to develop resilience. 

What are resilience scales?

Resilience scales are assessment tools that seek to measure and understand an individual’s ability to bounce back, or come back on track after they have experienced some stressful event in their lives. 

These scales usually assess what factors can help develop resilience as well as how likely an individual is able to be resilient in the face of stress and bounce back mentally and physically.

These scales are often used in clinical settings to understand how resilient clients are, in what areas, and what can be done to develop resilience. 

These tools are also used in research to understand the resilience of a group or a community in the face of threats, the factors that add to reiseince, and factors that negatively impact resilience amongst other things to add to the field of knowledge related to human resilience. 

What are the various kinds of resilience scales?

The various kinds of resilience scales include:

Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC)

The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale was developed by Kathryn M. Conner and Jonathan R.T. Davidson.

This scale was developed as a result of the ears of study and research of these two researchers in the area of PTSD. 

The scale is a test that measures how well an individual is equipped to bounce back after stress and traumatic events- basically measuring their resilience.

The scale measures things such as one’s ability to adapt to change, deal with future challenges, cope with stress, and stay focused even while under stress. 

The scale also measures how capable people are to remain optimistic even in face of failure and regulate difficult emotions and feelings such as anger, apin, and sadness.

The scale measures resilience in terms of various factors such as personal competence, ability of an individual to accept change, the influence of secure relationships with respect to reliance, as well as one’s self control, and spiritual influences with respect ot relsinece,

You can access this scale here

Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA)

The RSA, is a resilience scale first authored by Friborg et al. (2003).

It is a self report scale for adults that aims to examine interpersonal and intrapersonal factors that help facilitate resilience. 

This scale has been built on the theory that various factors such as personal/dispositional attributes, family support and other external support systems are what facilitate resilience and the individual ability to bounce back in the face of stress and adversity. 

The scale can be used for both practice and research and consist of  five scoring items that examine both the intrapersonal and interpersonal protective factors such as 

  • Personal Competence
  • Social Competence
  • Social Support
  • Family Coherence
  • Personal Structure (Ackerman, Positive Psychology)

You can access this scale here

Brief Resilience Scale

The brief resilience scale is a self report questionnaire that seeks to measure an individual’s ability to bounce back from stress rather than simply trying to understand what are the factors in their lives that help them develop resilience. 

This particular scale was developed by Smith et al. (2008) but it has not been used for clinical purposes as of yet but is used for research purposes. It consists of six items in total and three items are worded positively whereas the other three, negatively. 

The items are scored on a five point scale with higher the score, more resilient the individual. You can access this scale here

Resilience Scale

The Resilience Scale was developed by Wagnild and Young in 1993 and it consists of 25 items that measure the following elements of resilience: 

  • Meaning(or Purpose)
  • Perseverance
  • Self-Reliance
  • Equanimity
  • Existential Aloneness

You can access this scale here

Scale of Protective Factors (SPF)

The Scale of Protective Factors (SPF) was developed by Ponce-Garcia, Madwell, and Kennison in 2015 as a comprehensive measure of resilience, 

The scale focuses on various factors that can create a delay between the individual who experiences trauma and the dysfunction that occurs as a result of that trauma. 

The scale consists of 24 items that measure social-interpersonal factors such as social support and social skills, and cogetube-interpersonal factors such as prioritising, planing, and goal efficacy that contribute to resilience

You can access this scale here

Ego Resilience Scale

Ego Resilience scale was developed by Block and Kremen in 1996 to measure resilience in terms of one’s adaptability in the face of change outside of psychiatric context. 

This scale consists of 14 items rated from 1 to 4 with higher the score, higher the leaves of resilience of the individual. 

You can access this scale here.

Academic Resilience Scale (ARS-30)

Academic Resilience Scale (ARS-30) is a more recent scale that is used to assess resilience in context of academic success.

This scale measures the tendency of an individual’s ability to persevere and succeed in academics irrespective of challenges and adversaries. 

The scale measures 30 items on a five point scale and is used in school students as well as college students- in educational context and was developed to measure various constructs such as:

  • Perseverance
  • Reflecting and Adaptive Help-Seeking
  • Negative Affect and Emotional Response (Ackerman, Positive psychology)

You can access this scale here.

What is resilience?

Resilience refers to one’s ability to adapt and bounce back from adversity, failure, and conflict. It involves one’s ability and capacity to recover from challenges that affect us in healthy ways.

Resilience consists of a set of characteristics and contributing factors: 

Optimism is one factor that contributes to optimism where research finds that those who are optimistic tend to be more resilient as well as tend to remain resilient in the face of future resilience. 

It has also been observed that altruism and resilience are also linked positively where more resilient people tend to be more altruistic as well as people with a stronger moral compass also bounce back easier. 

Faith and Spirituality is another factor that is believed to help other people survive challenges and people who have a healthy sense of humour also have an easier time bouncing back. 

Individuals with a positive role model and stronger social support are also equipped in recline and have an easier time bouncing back after loss and disganpintments.

Another factor that impacts an individual’s ability to bounce back and resilience is the ability of an individual to leave their comfort zone and confront their fears as well as individuals who feel like they have purpose and meaning in their lives. (Acknerman, positive psychology)

How to develop resilience?

One of the best ways to develop resilience is through the ABCDE model which was introduced by Martin Seligman in 2012 and later developed in detail by Reivich and Shatté.

This ABCDE model explains how negative emotions are linked to a weakened level of resilience and can make it hard for people to develop the ability to bounce back easier. 

Let us look at the five steps of the ABCDE model that can help people build resilience. 

  • Adversity where the focus is on recognising our own negative and unhelpful thought patterns as the adversity as well as taking notice and identifying what behaviours are also causing adversity which makes it difficult to develop resilience.

For example, one of the negative thought patterns can become something like “I can’t do it, it is too hard.” every time you fail or you face a challenge that makes you give up. 

  • Beliefs involve taking the time to understand where the negative emotions are coming from. It also refers to taking the time to understand the beliefs that feed these negative emotions. 

For example, in the earlier example, your belief can be something like “I am incapable of doing anything.” “I am not good enough.”

  • Consequences here, you will have to make an effort to understand and recognize how these negative emotions and these negative patterns of thinking are affecting you.

In the earlier example, it can be affecting your ability to progress in your academics or your career or it can be impacting your self-worth. 

  • Disputation where you take effort to challenge them by asking yourself how true these thoughts are, or how realistic these beliefs are. 
  • Energization here you take the active effort to change the way you think or think in new perspectives or develop a new way of looking at your failures. It also includes you developing new steps of action that can help you get what you want.

Conclusion

In this blog we have discussed what resilience scales are.

We have also discussed what are the various kinds of resilience scales used in research and clinical practice, as well as understand what are somethings that one can do to develop resilience. 

What are resilience scales used for?

Resilience scales are often used in clinical settings to understand how resilient clients are, in what areas, and what can be done to develop resilience. 

These tools are also used in research to understand the resilience of a group or a community in the face of threats, the factors that add to reiseince, and factors that negatively impact resilience amongst other things to add to the field of knowledge related to human resilience. 

What are the 5 skills of resilience?

Five skills of developing resilience include:

  • Self-awareness.
  • Attention and mindful focus. 
  • Letting go- physical.
  • Letting go- mental.
  • Accessing positive emotion and sustaining it.

What is a resilient economy?

A resilient economy refers to an economic structure that has the capacity to bounce back from a particular economic shock and rapidly regain their previous leaves of maintenance, growth, or become even better in terms of their economic growth. 

What is vicarious resilience?

Vicarious resilience refers to the positive impact on the therapist and their own personal growth that occurs as a result of their exposure to client’s resilience and their own personal growth. 

What is social resilience?

Social resilience refers to the ability of a social system or a community to be able to respond and recover from a threat, disaster, or traumatic event as a whole.

References

Ackerman. C. How To Measure Resilience With These 8 Resilience Scales. Positive psychology. Retrieved on 20th Feb 2022. https://positivepsychology.com/3-resilience-scales/

Riopel.L.The Connor Davidson + Brief Resilience Scales. Positive Psychology. Retrieved on 20th Feb 2022.https://positivepsychology.com/connor-davidson-brief-resilience-scale/

Friborg, O., Hjemdal, O., Rosenvinge, J., & Martinussen, M. (2003). A new rating scale for adult resilience: What are the central protective resources behind healthy adjustment? International Journal of Methods in Psychiatric Research, 12(2), 65-76.

Ponce-Garcia, E., Madewell, A. N., & Kennison, S. M. (2015). The development of the scale of protective factors: Resilience in a violent trauma sample. Violence and victims, 30(5), 735-755.

What was missing from this post which could have made it better?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.